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Life Wealth Work

“We All Have 24 Hours a Day”

“We All Have 24 Hours a Day”.

Have you heard people say this before? Usually it’s said by someone humble-bragging about how they manage to work 10 hours a day, raise children and run three marathons a year. Of course, they’re usually saying this to someone who can’t seem to find time to work out (or something similar that can easily be dropped off the list of daily activities).

Yeah, we all have 24 hours a day. But, unfortunately, we don’t all have the tools to make the most of those 24 hours.

Let’s look at two extremes.

Julie is a single mother that works full time as a line-worker in an automobile factory. Her two kids are in grade 3 and 6. Her day starts at 6am when she prepares breakfast, lunches and shuttles her kids to before-school care. Julie gets to work in time for a 9 hour shift. By the time the school and work day is done and everyone is back home, it’s usually around 6pm. Just in time to prepare dinner and help with homework. Of course, this assumes that Julie has already gone grocery shopping earlier in the week. By the time dinner and dishes are done, it’s easily 8 or 8:30pm. Exhausted – mentally and physically – Julie now has about 1-2 hours of free time.

Does Julie catch up on some housework? Maybe. Self care? Likely not.

That’s where Julie’s 24 hours goes.

Compare that to Eddie, who is married with two children in grades 3 and 6. Eddie’s wife – Francine – is a marketing consultant and he works as a bank executive. They have a nanny, maid and comfortably hire people to help with household maintenance, like gardening. Their nanny manages the children full time, grocery shops, makes meals and handles school pickup and dropoff. Eddie and Francine work long hours, but often squeeze in some gym time at lunch or go for a run after work. They frequently attend functions after work to network for whatever moves come next.

Notice the difference?

Julie, Eddie and Francine are all equally busy. However, one family has way more sources of help than the other.

Some might blame Julie for her predicament. “She shouldn’t have gotten divorced”, “she should have worked harder and gone to university”, etc. What people fail to grasp is that Julie made the best of her situation. She came from a working class family that didn’t have money for the extra layers of support provided to Eddie and Francine in their youth.

Julie really had no choice but to reduce the burden she placed on her family by working at McDonalds through high school to help with bills. She blasting through community college and then took whatever decent job came first. Then came the children and emotionally abusive husband.

Eddie and Francine, on the other hand, came from upper-middle class families, which themselves hired nannies and maids. Their first jobs were handed to them by their parents’ friends, and were in junior corporate positions. Their parents never needed help with bills and Eddie and Francine could both comfortably educate themselves up to the masters level. While Eddie leveraged his junior corporate jobs into full time work, Francine took a risk and started her own business. If it failed she could always move back with her parents. By the time they married, Eddie and Francine were already getting more than their 24-hour’s worth.

“We All Have 24 Hours a Day”

There are 24 hours in a day, but unfortunately that time isn’t allotted the same way across classes.

If you’re someone who can afford help, count your blessings and realize that you have a huge advantage.

If you’re someone who can’t afford help, I suggest you identify your top 3 priorities in life and allow yourself to leave lesser priorities untended.

Start building wealth today!

Categories
Work

The Raise You Shouldn’t Take

Is there a certain point at which it no longer makes sense to pursue a greater income? Maybe.

I think you must consider the tradeoffs when contemplating a position with more responsibility and pay. Because the more you make the less you keep.

Much of the developed world has a progressive tax structure, in which people who earn more pay a greater proportion (and dollar amount) of their income in taxes. Marginal tax rates for top-earners in Canada are displayed in the table below, and are as high as 54%!

The marginal tax rate is the portion of each additional dollar earned that goes to the government. The more you earn in total, the more each incremental dollar is taken away by the tax man.

Source: BDO

I’m not here to debate whether or not this progressive tax structure is morally right or wrong. My point is that this tax structure creates a rising disincentive for individuals to pursue ever-greater incomes.

Once a person attains a certain income level, I feel the added career risk, burden and responsibility is often not adequately compensated by the extra income from climbing the corporate ladder. For some other perks – extra vacation, corporate perks, ego boost, etc. – offset this imbalance. For many, beyond a certain point pursuing a higher income simply isn’t worth the sacrifice.

Put differently, those who do wish to climb the corporate ladder must require increasingly large dollar increases in pay to rationalize the tradeoff.

Here’s an example:

Let’s say you’re a typical employee of Big Corporation XYZ in Toronto and you’re looing at building your career. You start off at the bottom of the barrel working as a clerk in the back office making $45,000 (and probably living in your parents’ basement). You work hard and after a couple years find a better role within the company that comes with a $20,000 pay increase. To you this raise is everything – to Big Corporation XYZ it’s not a huge deal as they weren’t paying you much to begin with.

At that time, when you earned $45,000, a twenty grand pay increase was huge! Not only did you just increase your pay by 44%, you kept 71% of it because you were in a low marginal tax bracket. In other words, most of that earnings growth ended up directly in your pocket. So you were highly incentivized to increase your gross salary, as you got to keep most of it.

However, this incentive changes as salaries grow. The chart below shows how much of your gross salary (red) that you get to keep (blue) as your gross salary rises. When you earn $25,000 you keep almost everything. But as your gross salary rises the tax man benefits almost as much as you.

This next chart shows similar information, but focuses on the gap between gross and net income.

Finally, this third chart shows the effect of $25,000 pay increases on your total net income. A $25k pay increase is way more impactful to someone earning $50,000 than it is to someone earning $150,000.

Anyone making $150k has a high stress job. Taking on additional stress and responsibility isn’t financially worth it for another $25k. Of course, there’s more to the decision than just money. However, if money is a motivating factor the amount must be considered after tax, and the marginal pay raise worthy of action must rise with total income.

Categories
Wealth

8 Simple Wealth Hacks for Financial Literacy Month

November is financial literacy month so here are some easy wealth-creating hacks:

  1. Sleep on major purchases. This allows time for emotional excitement to ease, so you can rationally consider your actions. Often, either the novelty of the potential purchase wears off or you forget about it altogether.
  2. Consider the pre-tax cost of purchases. Someone in a 30% tax bracket that pays a 13% sale tax needs to earn $161 to buy something that costs $100. (($100*1.13)/0.7)). Take this one step further and consider the number of hours you must work in order to earn that $161. You might re-consider more discretionary purchases.
  3. Immediately allocate your pay raises. For example, if you receive a pay raise of $100 month, you could increase your automatic monthly mortgage payment by $50, investment contribution by $25 and bank the rest. You’ve invested in your future while retaining a bit more spending money.
  4. Consider the ‘real estate’ required for each purchase. If a purchase simply adds to home clutter, perhaps it isn’t really needed.
  5. Start investing at a young age. The longer investments have to compound, the less you need to invest over your lifetime to reach a specific goal. In fact, if feasible, parents and grandparents can provide a 20yr head-start by investing a small amount during infancy.
  6. Avoid unnecessary expenses. Many administration fees, late fees, overdraft fees, etc. are unavoidable with good planning.
  7. Time vs. money. Your time is finite, so it’s important to balance time with money. If a purchase earns you valuable time to spend with family or build a business it might be worth the expense.
  8. Less investing activity is best. For most, the best investing strategy is to invest when you have the money and remain invested as long as possible. Few people – even professionals – are able to time the markets. So keep it simple and stick to a routine.